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18.6.15

Weight a Minute

Hi lovelies,
I was so nervous about posting this up, but there's no better time than now to do it, so here it goes.

In the lead up to my preparation for my new blog I'm calling What Danica Loves; which is basically "a visual diary of my favourite things", one of my main tasks was to look through my folders to find photographs I love. What I expected to find were pictures of family, friends, outfits and things; what I didn't expect to find was images of clothes I've never worn because I've been too paranoid about what my body would look like in them.
Yes, you read that right. Now I'm not trying to seek attention or compliments, I'm simply just trying to get real with you guys.
I want to use my platform to share stories, insecurities and advice with you guys.
Every blogger has a special knack/originality, I've come to realise that the best way I can feel inspired and good about what I'm blogging about is when I'm helping you guys by sharing my stories and insecurities, so that you never feel alone.

Growing up, I always had an issue with my weight. I've always been petite my entire life, but that didn't mean I was always "thin" - it just meant I was really small (I found myself as short and stubby rather than petite tbh.)
I spent half of primary school playing sports and involving myself in athletics,and found that this was when I started to gain muscle in my calves and upper-arms. So technically, I was fit, but I still found myself feeling "fat" because I didn't have a thigh-gap or a tremendously flat stomach.

I struggled even more with my weight throughout high school - as you can imagine. All of my girl friends were beautiful and skinny and perfectly proportioned, whilst I was petite but muscly because of my sporty background.

Now before you say anything, I know weight is a touchy subject in today's society. By in no means am I trying to offend anyone, I'm just trying to create a "food for thought" environment.

So now that I'm older and wiser (well, barely lol), I realised something - I'd been denying myself from feeling happy with my body because I had my own unrealistic ideas of what it meant to be happy. I was feeding off of other people's ideas of "body goals" that I forgot about my idea of feeling happy with my own body.
I should be feeling thankful that I'm healthy, and that I have family, friends and a boyfriend who find me beautiful no matter what number comes up on the scale.
Because naturally, as you step into adolescence, your body changes because you don't stay the size you were in sixth grade forever. It's called progression into becoming a woman.
And in my case, it was progression into becoming a mum.

It's taken me so long to get comfortable in my own skin again. No, I don't weigh myself daily. No, I don't exercise regularly. No, I don't eat healthy regularly. I look in the mirror and am happy with how I look. I exercise when I'm feeling good, and I eat junk food just about as much as I eat healthy. I don't want to base my days around crazy fad diets or counting calories. I don't want to raise my son believing your size matters - when it doesn't. Health matters. This also doesn't mean I'm going to feed my son and my body junk food 24/7. This doesn't mean I'm not taking care of my body - of course I am, it just means I have a different approach of what it means to be healthy and beautiful.

This doesn't mean I don't have days where I feel like absolute crap about myself. Of course I do, I'm human too! But the only way to get through it is feeling determined the next day to fix whatever you're unhappy about. If I'm feeling yucky because I'm bloated, I'll simply have a better meal the next day. If I'm feeling sluggish, I'll prepare a few days worth of exercises to keep me motivated. It's not about "losing weight", it's just about keeping my confidence levels up and earning that radiant glow of happiness.

Ever since I started dressing according to my size and what my body shape looks best in, my confidence levels have boosted and I'm honestly feeling happier than ever. I've accepted that I'm going to have curves my whole life. I've accepted that my weight doesn't define who I am.
And neither should you.

Now this was quite a lengthy post, but what I said was needed, in my opinion.
I'd like to think that my blog is somewhere I can rant openly and you guys will understand, not judge.

Now without further ado, a new look for you guys to feast on.
I never use to be a fan of tight skirts because of my mummy belly and my booty, but I've come to embrace them because this is me, and I'm simply happy.